About Cystectomy

A cystectomy is the surgical removal of all (simple or radical cystectomy) or part (segmental cystectomy) of the bladder. The procedure is done when bladder cancer has spread into the bladder wall or when other treatments have not been successful. Depending on how much of your bladder is removed, your doctor may need to create a new way for urine to leave your body. This is called urinary diversion.
Learn more about different types of cystectomy:

Segmental Cystectomy

Segmental cystectomy is a surgery to remove part of your bladder. If cancer has spread to your bladder wall but is limited to one area, your doctor may recommend a segmental cystectomy.
 
Because a segmental cystectomy removes only part of the bladder, most people are able to urinate normally after recovery.

Simple Cystectomy

A simple cystectomy is the removal of the entire bladder. If cancer has spread to numerous places in your bladder wall, or is near the openings where urine enters or leaves the bladder, a simple cystectomy may be needed to prevent it from spreading further.
 
Because a simple cystectomy removed the bladder, your doctor will create an alternate way for urine to leave your body. This is called urinary diversion.
 

Radical Cystectomy

If bladder cancer is advanced and has spread to the muscle wall or beyond, a radical cystectomy may be done. In a radical cystectomy, the entire bladder and any nearby lymph nodes and organs to which the cancer has spread may be removed.
 
In men, this may include the prostate and seminal vesicles. In women, it may include the uterus, ovaries and part of the vagina. Sometimes, if cancer has spread beyond the bladder and can’t be removed, the bladder may still be removed to reduce urinary symptoms caused by the cancer.
 
Because a simple cystectomy removed the bladder, your doctor will create an alternate way for urine to leave your body. This is called urinary diversion.